Small Business Marketing for Solo-Professionals

Based on my experience, the best small business marketing is relationship focused. In other words, instead of focusing on building a media presence where people recognize your logo like Nike or the golden arches, with small business marketing for private practitioners and other solo entrepreneurs, it’s you and the way you connect with people that matters.This is tried and true advice…Many large companies also rely on individual sales people to market their products by building a relationship with their potential clients. They know the value of relationship focused marketing.To do relationship focused small business marketing you have to first identify who your potential client is and where you can find them. One of the biggest mistakes many helping professionals and small business owners make is thinking everyone is their potential client.If you’re having difficulty narrowing down your target market, think about the types of people who definitely would not be interested in your service or product… and then who’s left? Out of those people…

Who has the money to pay?
Who has the most need?
Who can you most easily get your message to?
Who would you most like to work with?Once you’ve identified who your best possible clients might be, make a plan to build a relationship with them. You could go where they hang out or meet and get to know them. You could write articles in a publication they read and invite them to join your e-newsletter list. You could create a Facebook page about a topic that is of interest to them and post daily.As you and your potential clients get to know each other, let them know what you can do for them. If these people actually have a need and they know you and like you, the likelihood of them buying from you or using your service is much greater than if they don’t know you.

Ways To Effectively Work From Home

In this day and age, there are several people who work from home on a regular or on an on-and-off basis. The reasons could be numerous, starting from health issues, long commute, maternity, and so on. The belief that an employee needs to be in the office to be efficient is now gradually changing, with benefits of working from home arising aplenty. However, for some people, especially if you have just begun to work from home, things can get a bit overwhelming. Here are a few things you can do to organize your ‘home office’.

A Constant Office Space

Setting up one room (or a portion of a room) as your office can go a long way in creating a sense of mood and motivation that might otherwise be lacking when you are not in office. Fix a table, an ergonomic chair (yes, it is an investment you will not regret if you work from home regularly), and other essentials you might need for work, for example, a charging station for your computer or mobile phone around that area. Stick to that place the best you can while working and move away when you are not. You can still visit that area when you are not working, but make sure it is not close to the bed that you sleep in. In smaller houses this might be difficult to arrange but try to set up your workplace in a different room than your bedroom. This is not because you might accidentally climb onto your bed, and sleep during working hours, but because your quality of sleep at night might be affected by the presence of your work things.

Air Quality

While you are indoors through the major portion of the day, it is important to ensure you get sufficient ventilation, and good quality air to breathe. If you live in an area where the pollution level is low, keep your windows open at all times for the fresh air to stimulate your brain, and improve your efficiency. If, unfortunately, you live in an area where the outside air is horrid, an air purifier is recommended. Remember, your health is of utmost importance no matter from where you work.

Exercise

Although exercising is a mandate for everybody, it is even more crucial for people who work from home. When you are in office, you might take frequent breaks down to the cafeteria or a roadside tea/coffee shop, but when you are home, these breaks are eliminated from your routine. Hence, it is of utmost importance to exercise regularly. Choose whatever works for you – yoga, aerobics, weights, cardio, but be regular and diligent about it.

Venture Out

Make it a point to get out of the house at least for ten or fifteen minutes every working day. You could either run a quick errand such as going to the ATM, picking up dry-cleaning, buying dinner, and so on, or you could take a simple walk in your neighbourhood at the very least. Going outside once in a day and seeing other people on the road helps your brain relax, because, after all, we are all social beings.

Do Not Overwork

Many people, especially in the beginning, tend to feel guilty about not working from the office. They feel that they are not working enough, or something is missing. Some people have it even worse because others who go to office regularly have a tendency to point fingers and condemn those who work from home. Snide remarks such as “Oh, what do you know about the hectic traffic we go through”, or “You work from home, that must mean you have plenty of time”, to “I don’t think people who work from home actually get any work done”, are very commonly heard. Do not get bogged down by such things. Just because you work from home does not mean you should work longer hours. Fix your work hours as you would if you were in office, and stick to it.